This series of works calls into question the promise of representation associated with photography. The effervescent colors result from toxic chemical reactions concocted by Nelson in the dark room. On these backdrops painted by chemistry, geometric shapes are arranged in carefully crafted compositions. This process of sculpting with light relies largely onimprovisation, as the result cannot be foreseen, only approximated. At closersight, the vibrant hues resemble geological formations in stromatolites, built up over millions of years, or the seething liquid bubbling in geysers. As such, both the making and the appearance of the works queer processes of production and perception. Nelson does what is traditionally not ought to be done in photography, leading to images that look like something which they are not.